Say, "Hey!" BA

Buenos Aires - Day Eleven.  A very educational stop on our journey.  Home of The Tango, underground rivers, a very popular "parallel economy" (i.e. grey market) and, of course, the parilla (restaurants specializing in grilled meat).   This South American city has a very European feel, but it also reminds of us New York in the 80's.  There are beautiful areas, but there are some rough spots.

Last view of The Andes en route to Buenos Aires. 






  
  
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Last view of The Andes en route to Buenos Aires.

Caminito is street museum that focuses on the early immigrants who came to Argentina in the 1800's.  It's in the La Boca area where The Tango was born.

Caminito is street museum that focuses on the early immigrants who came to Argentina in the 1800's.  It's in the La Boca area where The Tango was born.

The city of Buenos Aires wants to be sure everyone knows how to Tango!  We found this on a main street.

The city of Buenos Aires wants to be sure everyone knows how to Tango!  We found this on a main street.

The parilla where we ate lunch (thank you, Michelle!! this was a GREAT recommendation!)  It's called Des Nivel and it's in the San Telmo area.

The parilla where we ate lunch (thank you, Michelle!! this was a GREAT recommendation!)  It's called Des Nivel and it's in the San Telmo area.

   






  
  
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 During Argentina’s “Dirty War” which was part of “Operation
Condor,” the military dictatorship embarked on a campaign of state run
terrorism against political dissidents and their sympathizers. It’s estimated
that from 1975 – 1978 at least 22,000 political dissidents were killed or
disappeared. 



 This symbol represents The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo – a
human rights organization that has been campaigning since 1977 to demand answers
from the government about what happened to their loved ones.  They wear white scarves around their heads
with the names of “The Disappeared” written on them.  And still gather every Thursday to march
around the Plaza de Mayo that is in front of the Casa Rosa (the Argentinian
White House).

  

During Argentina’s “Dirty War” which was part of “Operation Condor,” the military dictatorship embarked on a campaign of state run terrorism against political dissidents and their sympathizers. It’s estimated that from 1975 – 1978 at least 22,000 political dissidents were killed or disappeared.

This symbol represents The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo – a human rights organization that has been campaigning since 1977 to demand answers from the government about what happened to their loved ones.  They wear white scarves around their heads with the names of “The Disappeared” written on them.  And still gather every Thursday to march around the Plaza de Mayo that is in front of the Casa Rosa (the Argentinian White House).

   Evita is everywhere! 
Eva Perone was married to President Juan Peron and served as the first
lady of Argentina from 1946 until her death from cancer at age 33 in 1952.  She was a very political first lady and a
vocal champion for workers rights, women and the poor.  She is still beloved today and her image can
be found all around the city. 






  
  
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Evita is everywhere!  Eva Perone was married to President Juan Peron and served as the first lady of Argentina from 1946 until her death from cancer at age 33 in 1952.  She was a very political first lady and a vocal champion for workers rights, women and the poor.  She is still beloved today and her image can be found all around the city.

   La Recoleta cemetery contains the graves of notable
Argentinians including Evita, former Presidents and Nobel Prize winners.  






  
  
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La Recoleta cemetery contains the graves of notable Argentinians including Evita, former Presidents and Nobel Prize winners. 

People still leave fresh flowers at Evita’s tomb.  We promise a less funereal (less stuff about dead people) post tomorrow! 






  
  
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People still leave fresh flowers at Evita’s tomb.  We promise a less funereal (less stuff about dead people) post tomorrow!